Search

A concrete cantilevered building against blue sky and green landscaping

A museum interior space with paintings and concrete walls and stairs

A concrete-walled lobby with windows, a tiled floor, and a circular desk

The top of a concrete spiral staircase with a wooden railing

A tall tree is the focal point of a garden in between two concrete buildings

About arrow_back

Admission for everyone is always free! Check here for current hours and more.

A concrete cantilevered building against blue sky and green landscaping

Exhibitions arrow_back

Check out what’s on view this season at the Museum and look back through our history.

A museum interior space with paintings and concrete walls and stairs

Events arrow_back

Free events for everyone, plus special programs for students, families, and more!

A concrete-walled lobby with windows, a tiled floor, and a circular desk

Learn arrow_back

The Johnson Museum actively contributes to the intellectual life of our campus and community.

The top of a concrete spiral staircase with a wooden railing

Support arrow_back

Help the Johnson Museum continue its legacy by making a gift today.

A tall tree is the focal point of a garden in between two concrete buildings

Façade Projection: Paul Pfeiffer: Morning After the Deluge

Façade Projection
Paul Pfeiffer: Morning After the Deluge

Feb 11, 2021–Feb 25, 2021
A yellow sun breaks a horizon line with orange sky reflected in water below

On the east façade, sunset to midnight

Inspired by J. M. W. Turner’s similarly named painting from 1843, Light and Colour (Goethe’s Theory)—The Morning after the Deluge, Paul Pfeiffer’s video work opens with a white-hot sun suspended mid-frame in a brilliant red sky with a band of dark blue waves scrolling down from the top of the frame to its bottom. To create his breathtaking projection loop, the artist filmed Cape Cod sunrises and sunsets and digitally fused them into a single image. While Turner dissolved the features of traditional landscape painting, such as the horizon line and single-point perspective, into a painterly mist in his vision of the sun, Pfeiffer complicates the location of the observer within the picture and investigates the nature of vision itself by flipping the relationship between sun and horizon line, making the sun stable and the horizon unstable.

A yellow and orange image of the horizon and sun appears on the facade of the Johnson Museum building at twilight in the snow

Robert Barker Photography

Create an account

Please take a moment to fill your information to create your account.

Reset Password

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive mail with link to set new password.

Save Artwork

Save the artwork in any of your exhibitions or create a new one.

You have not made any exhibitions.

Create New Exhibition

Create New Exhibition