Search

A concrete cantilevered building against blue sky and green landscaping

A large green wall with oil paintings in gold frames above a tiled floor

A museum interior space with paintings and concrete walls and stairs

A concrete-walled lobby with windows, a tiled floor, and a circular desk

The top of a concrete spiral staircase with a wooden railing

A tall tree is the focal point of a garden in between two concrete buildings

About arrow_back

Admission for everyone is always free! Check here for current hours and more.

A concrete cantilevered building against blue sky and green landscaping

Collections arrow_back

The Johnson Museum holds more than 40,000 works in its collection from around the world.

A large green wall with oil paintings in gold frames above a tiled floor

Exhibitions arrow_back

Check out what’s on view this season at the Museum and look back through our history.

A museum interior space with paintings and concrete walls and stairs

Events arrow_back

Free events for everyone, plus special programs for students, families, and more!

A concrete-walled lobby with windows, a tiled floor, and a circular desk

Learn arrow_back

The Johnson Museum actively contributes to the intellectual life of our campus and community.

The top of a concrete spiral staircase with a wooden railing

Support arrow_back

Help the Johnson Museum continue its legacy by making a gift today.

A tall tree is the focal point of a garden in between two concrete buildings

Robert Rauschenberg

(American, 1925–2008)

Migration

View All Works

Object Details

Artist

Robert Rauschenberg

Date

1959

Medium

Collage and oil paint on canvas

Dimensions

Image: 49 7/8 x 40 inches (126.7 x 101.6 cm)

Credit Line

Anonymous gift through the American Federation of Arts, Museum Donor Program

Object
Number

59.141

Rauschenberg, suspicious of the pretensions of fine art, experiments freely with nonart items and ma(…)

Rauschenberg, suspicious of the pretensions of fine art, experiments freely with nonart items and materials that others would dismiss as junk. He has said, “I don’t really trust ideas, especially good ones. Rather I put my trust in the materials that confront me, because they put me in touch with the unknown.” Rauschenberg’s sensitivity to texture and material enables him to draw objects from completely unrelated contexts and juxtapose them in order to make a witty or poignant observation. In Migration, Rauschenberg has brought together many elements in a visually provocative manner: a clock without hands, a piece of a cardboard moving box, newspaper photographs, numbers from a sports jersey, and a soiled white shirt. He isolates these objects in distinct areas, yet pieces of the objects are found throughout the canvas. Even the paint that defines the areas is not static, but runs into neighboring colors. Rather than stating or even suggesting a fixed meaning, Rauschenberg brings together the flotsam and jetsam of the postindustrial world so that we, the viewers, are left to create our own set of meanings, just as we must do in the world outside the gallery. Collage assemblages such as Migration are typical of the works Rauschenberg produced in the 1950s, which changed during the 1960s with his greater use of the silkscreen process. (From “A Handbook of the Collection: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art,” 1998)

Discover More

Photocrystal

James Seawright

Tiberius #1

Beth Ames Swartz

Seeking One Thing

Cheryl Warrick

Create an account

Please take a moment to fill your information to create your account.

Reset Password

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive mail with link to set new password.

Save Artwork

Save the artwork in any of your exhibitions or create a new one.

You have not made any exhibitions.

Create New Exhibition

Create New Exhibition